Spotlight on Benefits Used to Recruit, Retain Employees

News Updates

In January 2013 the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) released a series of "State of Employee Benefits in the Workplace" reports, based on surveys fielded among SHRM members in 2012. Key findings highlighted the benefits most often used to help recruit and retain employees, and organizations' efforts to communicate the value of employer-sponsored benefits.

Recruitment

According to the findings reported in State of Employee Benefits in the Workplace—Leveraging Benefits to Recruit Employees, organizations reported health care (80 percent of respondents) and retirement savings and planning (63 percent) were the benefits most frequently leveraged (that is, used strategically) to recruit employees, and that these benefits will increase in importance for recruiting employees in the years ahead, as indicated below.

The benefits that organizations most often leveraged to recruit "highly skilled employees" were health care (75 percent) and retirement savings and planning (58 percent).

Retention

One in five (20 percent) organizations reported leveraging their benefits program to retain employees, according to State of Employee Benefits in the Workplace—Leveraging Benefits to Retain Employees. Similar to the recruitment findings, HR professionals reported that health care (72 percent) and retirement savings and planning (58 percent) were the benefits most frequently leveraged to retain employees, and that these benefits would become more important for retention in coming years, as indicated below.

 

HR professionals also reported that the most frequently leveraged benefits to retain "high-performing employees" were health care (58 percent), professional and career development benefits (55 percent) and flexible working benefits (48 percent).

Communications

While roughly three-fourths of respondents thought their benefits communications efforts were effective, only about one-quarter had an employee benefits communications budget in 2011, according to State of Employee Benefits in the Workplace—Communicating Benefits.

Very few organizations (4 percent) were using social media in their communications efforts, as indicated below, although 8 percent indicated they planned to start using social media within the next 12 months.

 

Stephen Miller, CEBS, is an online editor/manager for SHRM. To read the original article on shrm.org, please click here.