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#Nextchat: Employee Engagement -- Are You Listening to the Right Employees?

By Jason Lauritsen

Employee engagement surveys are a pretty big deal in a lot companies.  It makes sense that leaders want to understand how engaged their employees are with their business.  After all, who wouldn’t want employees who are switched on and putting in extra effort in their jobs?  It also makes sense that an all employee survey is the most efficient way to gather this kind of information.
 
Enter the employee engagement survey.  We conduct a survey, analyze the data, and look for ways to better engage your employees.  Then, it’s time to make...

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Is it OK to spy on your employees?

While less than 10 percent of companies now are monitoring employee use of social media sites like Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and others, that is likely to change over the next few years.  Gartner predicts that 60 percent of companies will be monitoring how their employees use social media by 2015.  Employers are interested in monitoring the posting of comments from employees about the company.  Companies say they monitor employees for reasons such as brand management, sentiment analysis and reputation purposes.  Oh and let’s not forget that social media checks are often  run on candidates before job offers are...

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#Nextchat Recap: Next Generation Leadership

On July 25,  SHRM We Know Next invited special guests Ryan Estis and Seth Mattison to chat about Next Generation Leadership. 

While Nextchatters were divided on whether the generational stereotypes hold true, they did agree that organizations will need to foster a culture of mentorship, where both sides truly believe they can learn from each other.  

It's not about who's right, wrong, better or worse.  We're different, and we need to leverage those differences to drive results. 

In case you missed it, here are all the great tweets from the chat:

 

 ...

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Recruiting After a PR and Brand Disaster

Sports recruiting is an intense industry.  Scouts spend years following hopeful athletes in high school and college.  If a talent scout represents a well-known school or professional organization the number of prospects that they may be able to recruit are considerably larger than those that represent lesser known or lesser performing institutions.  For example, in the state of Kentucky recruiting for University of Kentucky is significantly different than recruiting for Western Kentucky University.  The University of Kentucky has the ability to attract higher performer high school students than WKU based on the basketball programs performance.

What happens when...

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Will You Be Ready for the Future?

This report, generated by Institute For The Future for the University of Phoenix Research Institute:

“…analyzes key drivers that will reshape the landscape of work and identifies key work skills needed in the next 10 years. It does not consider what will be the jobs of the future. Many studies have tried to predict specific job categories and labor requirements. Consistently over the years, however, it has been shown that such predictions are difficult and many of the past predictions have been proven wrong. Rather than focusing on future jobs, this report looks at future work skills—proficiencies and...

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It's tough to prove age bias after getting caught sleeping on the job

I was reading this Third Circuit decision yesterday about an employee who got demoted for sleeping on the job, and all I could think of was Homer Simpson. For not unlike Homer J., a nuclear safety technician, this employee was responsible for monitoring his plant's equipment to prevent malfunctions that could result in explosions, property damage, injuries, and fatalities. Except, unlike Homer, the former employee was allegedly found sleeping on the floor of his office, with a pillow, blankets, and an alarm clock nearby. Now that's what I call an all-out Costanza! All that's missing here...

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Nextchat: Next Generation Leadership

Today’s workplace is experiencing a revolution. Technology and the introduction of new methods of communicating, networking and collaborating have changed the way we do business and have created new challenges for leadership.

It's also a transformative era for the human resources profession. We’ve entered a unique epoch in history where four generations are intersecting in the workplace. Each carries with it deeply held convictions, attitudes, ideas and expectations about the value and meaning of work.

Of course, these challenges will exist any time a new generation comes of age, but younger professionals today have markedly different philosophies about...

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Five Ingredients For Virtual Success

"Globally linked virtual teams will transform every government and company in the world. Any of our peers who don’t do it won’t survive."

-John Chambers, CEO, Cisco
 

Rising travel costs, coupled with the global dispersion of talent, are just some of the reasons that organizations have migrted toward telecommuting and virtual work.  While numerous organizations have made significant investments in virtual teams and the technology to support them, a surprising number of virtual teams are not reaching their full potential.
 
OnPoint Consulting surveyed 48 virtual teams across industries and...

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Executive Book Club: July 2012

Recognized as a leading expert on executive compensation, Robin A. Ferracone combines her own 20 years of experience with interviews with executives and compensation committees to provide a clear examination of and guidance on determining pay packages, actions, and designs in Fair Pay, Fair Play.

Ferracone is founder and executive chair of Farient Advisors LLC and founder and CEO of RAF Capital LLC. She is a 30-year veteran of the executive compensation consulting world and has worked at Farient Advisors, Mercer, SCA Consulting, and Booz Allen &...

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Eight Ways To Run Great Meetings

Poorly run meetings start in the wrong place and end up rushed before they’re done.

Right place: Leave inconsequential items for the end. Deal with big items at the beginning. I’m tempted to check off a few quick agenda items before digging into the meat of meetings. It’s seductive but ineffective and inefficient.

Don’t prioritize insignificant agenda items by placing them first.

Starting with insignificant issues raises their significance. Trivial items frequently take longer than expected. Additionally, you’re wasting your best moments on least important issues.

Better to rush through less consequential items – at the...

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