Addressing Workplace Harassment #WeAreWork

 

 

 

 

SHRM is engaged in deep and critical conversations around issues impacting the workplace, including workplace harassment. In the second in our series of #WeAreWork conversations, SHRM President and CEO Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., and Betty Thompson, Chief People Officer for Booze Allen Hamilton, discuss HR’s role in creating and sustaining a healthy culture that prevents workplace harassment and discrimination – and the need for proactive policy and training.

Now, more than ever, employers can’t react to workplace harassment with rules, education, and training alone. Culture is the key to a harassment-free workplace, and every decision an employer makes within an organization strengthens or weakens a culture – from who you recruit, promote and reward to how you respond to bad behavior.

Culture change, led by HR, challenges everyone in the organization, from the C-suite down, to step back and ask: ‘What do we really believe in as a company and workforce?’ If you don’t like the answer, you must be prepared to lead a culture change.

HR is the guardian of culture. Increased awareness and decreased tolerance of workplace harassment create an opportunity for changing policy, procedures, and culture like never before.

Every decision made within an organization strengthens or weakens a culture – from who you recruit and reward to how you respond to bad behavior. One question we occasionally here is: “Can we trust HR?” The answer is yes. HR balances the sometimes-conflicting responsibility of being a trusted resource for all employees and an effective partner for the business. Visit shrm.org/work to learn more.

 

 

 

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