4 HR Bartender Predictions for 2012

It’s that time of year again, when we sit around and try to predict what will happen in the months to come.  I just read an article that 2012 could be the year of payback.  Employees will really make those moves that have been predicted since 2009.  
 
If that’s true, I see an overall trend of companies shifting toward training and development as a retention and recognition tool.  Here how it could impact how training might look this year.
 
1. Social learning and gamification will be in demand.  With the popularity of Facebook and mobile games, companies will be looking for ways to bring this kind of fun into corporate learning.  Who knows, maybe Second Life will make a comeback?
 
2. Higher education will continue to increase use of technology in curriculum design.  To maintain enrollment numbers, colleges and universities will look to have increased presence beyond the traditional brick and mortar learning environment.  We’ll see more blended learning and eLearning programs to attract and retain students who need a flexible environment.
 
3. Management coaching will become a strategic retention tool.  Companies will give employees coaches as a way to show them that they care. This could be a key retention approach, sending the message that the employee has a future with the company.  
 
4. Corporate training will change in the upcoming year as well.  Participants will want to talk about their issues during their training time.  This means training agendas will need to include some free flowing discussion time.  And, trainers will need to not only have solid content and good platform skills but be savvy in the art of facilitation.
 
What do you see happening in 2012?  Leave your predictions in the comments.
 
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COMMENTS 1

Comments

The thing about telecommuting that many popele seem to miss, is that telecommuting is a species of working remote , i.e. off-site and that all the same attributes of a given job that make it suitable for telecommuting, also make it suitable for outsourcing.I'm betting that this is one of the reasons why telecommuting isn't more common. Once the challenges of remote work are overcome, it no longer matters where the worker is located, by definition so why not take advantage of cheaper labor markets once that's done? All the other issues (culture, language, finding the needed skills) connected to outsourcing still exist, but adapting the company pipeline to off-site work is one of the big ones.I have long wondered why telecommuting isn't more popular in my field; I believe that the strong similarities between TC and outsourcing is a big reason why.

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